Joint Commission Review: Process for Telephone and Verbal Orders

Do you know the process for telephone and verbal orders?

  • Write down verbal/telephone orders in the order section of the medical record as it is being said.
  • Read back what is written, verify accuracy, then document VOV (verbal order verified) or TOV (telephone order verified).
  • Each order is flagged for signature and is be signed/authenticated by a licensed independent practitioner.

Learn more on the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Where Do You Find Joint Commission Survey Readiness Info?

The Office of Quality and Patient Safety and the Marketing and Communications Department have developed some quick and easy reference materials to help you prepare for our Joint Commission survey. Visit the education tools section on the SafeCare page on OurNet for resources to help you prepare including:

For additional copies of the Joint Commission posters or readiness booklets email Talia LaPointe. See more on the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Today We Recognize National Time Out Day

Do you follow Universal Protocol and know that it is a three-step process? If you answer YES to the following, you are helping to provide safe care for all our patients.

  1. Do you use a pre-verification list, script or process to verify that you are ready to do the procedure?
  2. Is the site marked if laterality is involved?
  3. Is a time out performed before all invasive/surgical procedures (except in an emergency if the risks outweigh the benefits)?
    1. Does the entire team STOP and participate?
    2. When there is a question, is the procedure delayed until clarified?
    3. Do you know that everyone is empowered to stop the procedure from moving forward?
    4. Is the time out documented?

Learn more on the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Joint Commission: Life Safety and Environment of Care Questions

During our upcoming survey, you may be asked a life safety (i.e., fire protection) or environment of care question. You should be familiar with the fire plan, emergency contact numbers, location of fire extinguishers and pull stations, and egress routes from your work area. If you don’t have all the answers, relax, take a breath, and show the surveyor how and where to get the information. The Joint Commission values your safe care work. Learn more on the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Tools to Ensure You’re Ready for the Joint Commission Survey

Talia LaPointe, project manager, pictured left, with Joint Commission posters and Survey Readiness booklets, above.

Are you ready for the upcoming Joint Commission survey? Subject matter experts from across the Medical Center and the Regulatory and Public Reporting Department worked together as a team to create educational materials to prepare staff for the upcoming Joint Commission survey. Visit the education tools section on the SafeCare page on OurNet for resources to help you prepare:

For additional copies of the Joint Commission posters or readiness booklets, email Talia LaPointe.

Now Available on Demand: Our New Joint Commission Webinar

jc-webinar.jpgNeed a quick review to get ready for the upcoming Joint Commission survey? Register for the new webinar, What You Need to Know: Tips for a Successful Joint Commission Survey, now available on demand to watch at your convenience! In 10 minutes, you can learn about the Joint Commission process, hear crucial reminders, and understand the top clinical issues and challenges common in health care. A PDF of the webinar’s PowerPoint presentation is available in the resources section of the webinar. Register to watch the video today!

Core Idea of the Week: Making Prep for Joint Commission Fun!

Julianne Ryll, RN

Knowing some of her staff is new to a Joint Commission visit, Julianne Ryll, RN, ambulatory nurse manager, Cardiovascular Clinic, earned the Core Idea of the Week. She infused fun into preparing for the survey by creating the Joint Commission Readiness Question of the Day contest for one month. Those who answered correctly were entered into a weekly drawing; winners were selected at the team’s Idea Board huddle. Not only did staff become familiar with what a Joint Commission surveyor may look for or ask, they also had a good time in the process! Learn from Julianne and create your own team contest using resources on the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Joint Commission Readiness: Questions to Ask Yourself

The Joint Commission values the safe care you provide to patients. Check your readiness. Are you able to answer yes to these questions?

  • Can you speak to the interdisciplinary plan of care and goals for your patient?
  • Can you navigate the electronic and paper medical record to show how your patient’s plan of care is documented?
  • Do you document the education you provide to your patient about his/her new medications?
  • Do you verify that a history and physical was done prior to an invasive procedure that the provider evaluated the patient’s history and examined the patient?

Learn more on the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Joint Commission Readiness: Spotlight on Our Rapid Response Team

A Rapid Response Team delivers urgent clinical care to:

  • Adult patients on nursing units outside of the ICUs
  • Adult and pediatric outpatients under evaluation in diagnostic units and procedural areas on the University and Memorial campuses (excluding the Ambulatory Care Center and Levine Building).

The Rapid Response Team can be called by staff, patients, visitors or family members of patients. Call as early as possible when there are new signs of serious clinical deterioration (e.g., trouble breathing, confusion, unusual sleepiness). We can help in this process by teaching patients and visitors to dial extension 22222 for the Rapid Response Team. Learn more by visiting the SafeCare page on OurNet.

Joint Commission Readiness: Spotlight on Our Rapid Response Team

Here’s a Joint Commission refresher! Did you know that a Rapid Response Team delivers urgent clinical care to:

  • Adult patients on nursing units outside of the ICUs
  • Adult and pediatric outpatients under evaluation in diagnostic units and procedural areas on the University and Memorial campuses (excluding the Ambulatory Care Center and the Levine Building).

The Rapid Response Team can be called by staff, patients, visitors or family members of patients. Call as early as possible when there are new signs of serious clinical deterioration (e.g., trouble breathing, confusion, unusual sleepiness, etc.). We can help in this process by teaching patients and visitors to dial extension 22222 for the Rapid Response Team. Learn more on the SafeCare page on OurNet.